Department of Social Science

McFarland Hall 3rd Floor 315
Department Chair:
Anthony Dutton, Ph.D.
Assistant: Amber Olson
amber1.olson@vcsu.edu
(800) 532-8641 extension 37580
(701) 845-7580
FAX: (701) 845-7328
www.vcsu.edu/academics/divisions/cass/socsc/

The focus of study in the Department of Social Science is humanity in its broadest dimensions, specifically those highly developed human capabilities of communication and social organization.

The general goals of the department are:

  1. To help all students achieve a better understanding of the common cultural heritage, beliefs, and values through study of the humanities;
  2. To promote an understanding of social organization and interactions through the study of history, the social sciences, and psychology; and
  3. To promote global awareness and appreciation of diverse cultures through the study of world cultures, history and geography and to provide opportunities to study in other countries.
 

Clark, Travis (2016) Instructor; B.S. East Tennessee State University, M.A. University of North Dakota

da Vinha, Luis (2014) Assistant Professor; B.A., M.A., Ph.D. University of Coimbra

Dutton, Anthony (2009) Associate Professor; B.S.Ed. Valley City State University, M.A. University of North Dakota, Ph.D. North Dakota State University

Fenster, Emily (2013) Assistant Professor; B.A. University of North Dakota. M.G.S., Ph.D. Miami University

King, Steven (2005) Associate Professor; B.A. Oak Hills Christian School, M.A. St. Cloud State University, D.A. University of North Dakota

Klingenberg, Erin D. (1990) Assistant Professor; B.A. Jamestown College, M.Ed. University of North Dakota, M.Ed., Ph.D. North Dakota State University Licensed Professional Clinical Counselor, National Certified Counselor

Woehl, Kathryn (2010) Associate Professor; B.S. North Dakota State University, M.S. St. Cloud State University, M.A, Ph.D. University of North Dakota

CJ 252. Introduction to the Social and Criminal Justice System. 3 Credits.

An overview of the criminal justice process, including law-making, law enforcement, criminal proceedings, and societal responses.
Typically Offered: Fall.

CJ 390. Criminology and Delinquency. 3 Credits.


Typically Offered: Spring, odd years.
Prerequisite: SOC 110.
Same As: CJ 390/SOC 390.

CJ 416. Corrections: Institutional and Community. 3 Credits.

Analysis of institutional and community based corrections. Emphasis on historical, contemporary, and developing trends and processes.
Typically Offered: Spring, even years.
Prerequisite: PSYC 111 or SOC 110.

ECON 201. Principles of Microeconomics. 3 Credits.

This is an introductory study of microeconomics. The course emphasizes the price system, market structure, resource allocation, and income distribution.
Typically Offered: Fall, Spring.

ECON 202. Principles of Macroeconomics. 3 Credits.

This is an introductory study of macroeconomics. The course emphasizes national income, fiscal and monetary theory and policy, unemployment, and inflation.
Typically Offered: Fall, Spring.

ECON 261. Business Statistics. 3 Credits.

The course introduces students to descriptive and inferential statistics. Topics include: probability, data collection methods, inferences about one or more populations, tests of significance, tests of hypotheses, and regression analysis.
Typically Offered: Fall, Spring.
Prerequisites: BOTE 336 and MATH 103.

ECON 299. Special Topics. 1-4 Credits.

Courses not offered in the regular catalog that provide an opportunity to extend student learning.
Typically Offered: On sufficient demand.
Repeatable: Up to 12 Credits.

ECON 314. History of Economic Thought. 3 Credits.

A study of the development of economic thought from pre-Mercantilism through post-Keynesian. Cross-referenced with HIST 314.
Typically Offered: Fall, odd years.
Prerequisites: ECON 201 and ECON 202.
Same As: ECON 314/HIST 314.

ECON 350. Money and Banking. 3 Credits.

A course designed to acquaint students with, and to help them understand, financial markets, institutions, and the Federal Reserve System. The course enables students to analyze and evaluate regulation of the financial system as well as monetary policy. Current issues in domestic and international financial systems are emphasized.
Typically Offered: Fall, even years.
Prerequisites: ECON 201 and ECON 202.

ECON 394. Independent Study. 1-3 Credits.

Directed reading, study, and/or activities in selected topics.
Typically Offered: On sufficient demand.
Repeatable: Up to 12 Credits.

ECON 399. Special Topics. 1-4 Credits.

Courses not offered in the regular catalog that provide an opportunity to extend student learning.
Typically Offered: On sufficient demand.
Repeatable: Up to 12 Credits.

ECON 460. The Atlantic World. 3 Credits.

This course is an interdisciplinary investigation of the political, economic, and social developments that shaped the region, from the age of empires to the decolonization of the twentieth century. Using a comparative approach, this course examines the Atlantic community constructed between Africa, Western Europe and the Americas, with particular attention to the interactions on matters of migration, market economies, ideology and cultural exchange. Cross-referenced with HIST 460 and GEOG 460.
Typically Offered: Spring, odd years.
Same As: ECON 460/GEOG 460/HIST 460.

ECON 494. Undergraduate Research. 3-12 Credits.

The course is designed to integrate subject matter from major coursework and other disciplines into a project that leads to the creation of an original body of knowledge.
Typically Offered: On sufficient demand.
Repeatable: Up to 12 Credits.

ECON 499. Special Topics. 1-4 Credits.

Courses not offered in the regular catalog that provide an opportunity to extend student learning.
Typically Offered: On sufficient demand.
Repeatable: Up to 12 Credits.

GEOG 100. Introduction to Earth Science. 4 Credits.

A broad, non-quantitative survey of topics in geology, oceanography, meteorology, and astronomy. This course is a prerequisite for many upper division courses and includes laboratory work. Cross-referenced with GEOL 100.
Typically Offered: Fall, Spring.
Same As: GEOG 100/GEOL 100,GEOG 100/GEOL 100.

GEOG 106. The Earth Through Time. 4 Credits.

A lecture and laboratory course which provides an introduction to the earth through time. Topics include the origin and history of the planet and the history and evolution of animal and plant life. The laboratory work involves studying fossils and interpreting geologic maps and stratigraphic columns. Cross-referenced with GEOL 106.
Typically Offered: Spring.
Prerequisite: GEOL 100/GEOG 100.
Same As: GEOG 106/GEOL 106,GEOG 106/GEOL 106.

GEOG 111. Survey of Geography. 2 Credits.

A survey of human, regional, political, physical, religious, and social geography of the world. This course will look at the ever changing relationship between human activity and its impact on the geographical landscape. The course will also look at spatial interaction and mapping, the use of natural resources, and socioeconomic development.
Typically Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer.

GEOG 151. Human Geography. 3 Credits.

A non-ethnocentric examination of the geography of human lifestyles and activities and their roles in human-environment interaction.
Typically Offered: Spring.

GEOG 299. Special Topics. 1-4 Credits.

Courses not offered in the regular catalog that provide an opportunity to extend student learning.
Typically Offered: On sufficient demand.
Repeatable: Up to 12 Credits.

GEOG 300. Environmental Earth Science. 4 Credits.

Environmentally focused course which studies and investigates important earth science problems affecting North Dakota, the United States, and the world. Working as a class, in groups, or as individuals, students do labs, field work, and research resulting in presentations about earth science topics. Cross-referenced with GEOL 300.
Typically Offered: Spring, odd years.
Prerequisite: GEOL 100/GEOG 100.
Same As: GEOG 300/GEOL 300.

GEOG 320. Applied Geography Workshop. 1 Credit.

This course will study applied geographical issues of the world. This course is designed to present field related topics that are new or changing in the discipline of geography.
Typically Offered: On sufficient demand.

GEOG 325. History and Geography of England and Britain. 3 Credits.

A study of the geography and the political, economic, and social history of England and its empire from antiquity to the present. Cross-referenced with HIST 325.
Typically Offered: Spring, odd years.
Same As: GEOG 325/HIST 325.

GEOG 345. History and Geography of Spain and Latin America. 3 Credits.

The history and geography of Spain from Roman times and Latin America from contact, through the contemporary era. This course involves in-depth analysis of primary sources, physical geography, theories of development and historiographic trends that shape study of the regions Cross-referenced with HIST 345.
Typically Offered: On sufficient demand.
Same As: GEOG 345/HIST 345.

GEOG 362. Geography of North America. 3 Credits.

A spatial approach to the development of the United States and Canada which stresses changing cultural landscapes and assessing impacts of planning for resource utilization.
Typically Offered: Fall, odd years.

GEOG 365. Russia And Her Neighbors. 3 Credits.

An investigation of the past, present and future of the countries which were formerly part of the Union of Soviet Socialist Republics. Cross-referenced with HIST 365
Typically Offered: On sufficient demand.
Same As: GEOG 365/HIST 365.

GEOG 391. Global Seminar. 1-3 Credits.

Interdisciplinary examination of a specific language, culture, and its current local/global issues. In-depth experiences in the country of student's choice. Required before a study-abroad program travel. Cross-referenced with ENGL 391, HIST 391, HUM 391, and SPAN 391
Typically Offered: Spring.
Same As: ENGL/GEOG/HIST/HUM/SPAN 391.

GEOG 394. Independent Study. 1-3 Credits.

Directed reading, study, and/or activities in selected topics.
Typically Offered: On sufficient demand.
Repeatable: Up to 12 Credits.

GEOG 399. Special Topics. 1-4 Credits.

Courses not offered in the regular catalog that provide an opportunity to extend student learning.
Typically Offered: On sufficient demand.
Repeatable: Up to 12 Credits.

GEOG 460. The Atlantic World. 3 Credits.

This course is an interdisciplinary investigation of the political, economic, and social developments that shaped the region, from the age of empires to the decolonization of the twentieth century. Using a comparative approach, this course examines the Atlantic community constructed between Africa, Western Europe and the Americas, with particular attention to the interactions on matters of migration, market economies, ideology and cultural exchange. Cross-referenced with ECON 460 and HIST 460.
Typically Offered: Spring, odd years.
Same As: ECON 460/GEOG 460/HIST 460.

GEOG 492. Field Experience in Geography. 1-4 Credits.

A flexible requirement providing the opportunity for students to study a variety of environments in the field and to gain experience in outdoor living. A special project or internship may be substituted with department approval.
Typically Offered: Fall, even years.
Repeatable: Up to 4 Credits.

GEOG 494. Undergraduate Research. 3-12 Credits.

The course is designed to integrate subject matter from major coursework and other disciplines into a project that leads to the creation of an original body of knowledge.
Typically Offered: On sufficient demand.
Repeatable: Up to 12 Credits.

GEOG 499. Special Topics. 1-4 Credits.

Courses not offered in the regular catalog that provide an opportunity to extend student learning.
Typically Offered: On sufficient demand.
Repeatable: Up to 12 Credits.

HIST 103. United States to 1877. 3 Credits.

A survey of U.S. History from the pre-Columbian era through 1877. The course examines causes of European exploration and colonization, the American Revolution, and the Civil War. Topics include abolitionism, political, social, and economic development of the new nation, Manifest Destiny, and Reconstruction.
Typically Offered: Fall, Spring.

HIST 104. United States to Present. 3 Credits.

A survey of U.S. History from Reconstruction through the last decade. Attention is given to social, economic and political history as well as the role of minorities and women in the development of modern American society. Topics addressed include segregation, immigration, major political movements, U.S. foreign policy, and civil rights.
Typically Offered: Spring.

HIST 211. World Civilizations to 1500. 3 Credits.

A survey of civilization to 1500 including a focus upon the early Middle East, Egypt, Rome, and Europe with attention to Asia, Africa, and South America.
Typically Offered: Fall.

HIST 212. World Civilizations since 1500. 3 Credits.

A survey of civilization since 1500. Topics include the Reformation, Absolutism, the French Revolution, the Industrial Revolution, Colonialism, Nationalism, and 20th Century World History including that of Africa, Asia, and South America.
Typically Offered: Spring.

HIST 220. North Dakota History. 3 Credits.

A general study of North Dakota geography, government, and history from 1800 to the present. Special emphasis is placed on the diversity of native and immigrant peoples.
Typically Offered: Spring, odd years.

HIST 260. Women in America. 3 Credits.

A survey of the history of women in America from pre-Colonial times to the present. Special attention is given to the role women played in the cultural, social, economic, and political development of the United States.
Typically Offered: On sufficient demand.

HIST 267. Environmental History. 3 Credits.

A survey of the interrelationship between the natural environment and the people who inhabit the land. Emphasis is given to the factors and events which have changed and challenged America's attitude toward the land and its natural resources. The course covers both grassroots movements and government policies that have resulted in the conservation and environmental movements in American history. Cross-referenced with BIOL 267.
Typically Offered: Spring, odd years.
Same As: BIOL 267/HIST 267,BIOL 267/HIST 267.

HIST 270. Native American Studies. 3 Credits.

A multicultural study of Native American cultural and historical development. Topics addressed include interactions with European and Anglo-American settlers and government, agency and the concept of the Middle Ground, U.S. federal Indian policy, cultural resurgence, and North Dakota Indian tribes. Cross-referenced with SOC 270.
Typically Offered: Fall, even years.
Same As: HIST 270/SOC 270,HIST 270/SOC 270.

HIST 299. Special Topics. 1-4 Credits.

Courses not offered in the regular catalog that provide an opportunity to extend student learning.
Typically Offered: On sufficient demand.
Repeatable: Up to 12 Credits.

HIST 300. Race, Ethnic, and Gender Relations. 3 Credits.

The social-historical study of racial, ethnic, and gender relations. Cross-referenced with SOC 300.
Typically Offered: Fall, odd years.
Prerequisite: SOC 110.
Same As: HIST 300/SOC 300.

HIST 314. History of Economic Thought. 3 Credits.

A study of the development of economic thought from pre-Mercantilism through post-Keynesian. Cross-referenced with ECON 314.
Typically Offered: Fall, odd years.
Prerequisites: ECON 201 and ECON 202.
Same As: ECON 314/HIST 314.

HIST 320. History of American West. 3 Credits.

A study of the political, economic and social impact of the West upon the course of American history.
Typically Offered: Spring, even years.

HIST 321. History of Ancient Greece and Rome. 3 Credits.

A study of the political, economic, and social history of the two ancient foundations of Western Civilization.
Typically Offered: Fall, odd years.

HIST 325. History and Geography of England and Britain. 3 Credits.

A study of the geography and the political, economic, and social history of England and its empire from antiquity to the present. Cross-referenced with GEOG 325.
Typically Offered: Spring, odd years.
Same As: GEOG 325/HIST 325.

HIST 330. History of the Civil War Era (1850-1877). 3 Credits.

A study of the political, economic, and social causes and consequences of the Civil War era upon U.S. History.
Typically Offered: Fall, odd years.

HIST 345. History and Geography of Spain and Latin America. 3 Credits.

The history and geography of Spain from Roman times and Latin America from contact, through the contemporary era. This course involves in-depth analysis of primary sources, physical geography, theories of development and historiographic trends that shape study of the regions. Cross-referenced with GEOG 345.
Typically Offered: On sufficient demand.
Same As: GEOG 345/HIST 345.

HIST 365. Russia And Her Neighbors. 3 Credits.

An investigation of the past, present and future of the countries which were formerly part of the Union of Soviet Socialist Republics. Cross-referenced with GEOG 365.
Typically Offered: On sufficient demand.
Same As: GEOG 365/HIST 365.

HIST 375. U.S. Constitution: Federalism. 3 Credits.

A narrative and case study of the development of the U.S. Constitution including U.S. Supreme Court decisions related to the development of Federalism in fact and theory. Cross-referenced with POLS 375.
Typically Offered: Spring, even years.
Same As: HIST 375/POLS 375.

HIST 376. U.S. Constitution: Civil Liberties. 3 Credits.

A narrative and case study of the development of the U.S. Constitution including U.S. Supreme Court decisions related to the exercise of civil liberty in fact and theory. Cross-referenced with POLS 376.
Typically Offered: Fall, odd years.
Same As: HIST 376/POLS 376.

HIST 380. The American Presidency. 3 Credits.

A study of the development of the American presidency through time including representative presidential administrations, i.e. Washington, Jefferson, Jackson, Lincoln, Theodore Roosevelt, Wilson, Franklin D. Roosevelt, Truman, Eisenhower, Johnson, Nixon, Carter, Reagan, and Bush. Cross-referenced with POLS 380.
Typically Offered: Fall, even years.
Same As: HIST 380/POLS 380.

HIST 385. History of Canada. 3 Credits.

A study of the political, economic, and social history of Canada from the 17th century to the present. Special attention is given to Canadian multiculturalism and to Canada's development within the British Empire.
Typically Offered: On sufficient demand.

HIST 391. Global Seminar. 1-3 Credits.

Interdisciplinary examination of a specific language, culture, and its current local/global issues. In-depth experiences in the country of student's choice. Required before a study-abroad program travel. Cross-referenced with ENGL 391, GEOG 391, HUM 391, and SPAN 391.
Typically Offered: Spring.
Same As: ENGL/GEOG/HIST/HUM/SPAN 391.

HIST 399. Special Topics. 1-4 Credits.

Courses not offered in the regular catalog that provide an opportunity to extend student learning.
Typically Offered: On sufficient demand.
Repeatable: Up to 12 Credits.

HIST 400. Historiography. 3 Credits.

A detailed and analytical examination of the evolution of the study of history through time. Special emphasis is given to representative works of major historians.
Typically Offered: Spring, even years.

HIST 450. History of the U.S. since 1950. 3 Credits.

An in-depth study of the key social, political, and economic developments in the U.S. since 1950. Particular emphasis is given to the Cold War, the counter-culture movements of the 1960s, the Civil Rights Movement, the emergence of a strong Women's Movement, the American War in Vietnam, and the conservative backlash of the 1980s, and the War on Terror. Issues of ethnocentrism, cultural diversity, and shifting demographic patterns are also discussed.
Typically Offered: On sufficient demand.

HIST 454. Renaissance/Reformation. 3 Credits.

An in-depth study of religious, scientific, maritime, social, and political events in Europe between 1450 and 1648. Particular attention is given to the impact of the Reformation in Europe. This course delineates those qualities of life which transformed Europe and the Transatlantic World.
Typically Offered: Fall, even years.

HIST 460. The Atlantic World. 3 Credits.


Typically Offered: Spring, odd years.
Same As: ECON 460/GEOG 460/HIST 460.

HIST 465. The Contemporary World. 3 Credits.

A study of the world since 1945, with particular emphasis on recent history. This course encourages students to view the world around them through the eyes of developing nations, emerging nation-states, and the global village concept, as represented by the vast array of information technologies available to the average person. Issues surrounding nuclear proliferation, apartheid, decolonization, international development, and the politics of oil receive special attention.
Typically Offered: On sufficient demand.

HIST 470. Topics in Non-Western History. 3 Credits.

A study of selected areas of the wold that lie outside of the purview of Western history. Special attention is give to Africa, India, China, Japan, Latin America, or Asia.
Typically Offered: Fall, odd years.
Repeatable: Up to 6 Credits.

HIST 490. Methods of Teaching Social Science. 3 Credits.

A study of methods used in teaching social science. Emphasis is on techniques and sources of materials. This course must be successfully completed before student teaching.
Typically Offered: Fall, even years.
Prerequisite: Admitted to Teacher Education.

HIST 491. Senior Capstone. 1 Credit.

This course will assist student in creating the capstone portfolio. The course addresses technical application, content, and self-reflection.
Typically Offered: Fall.
Grading: S/U only.

HIST 492. Historical Research Methods. 3 Credits.

A study of methodologies and sources historians use when conducting research. Students conduct original research.
Typically Offered: On sufficient demand.

HIST 494. Undergraduate Research. 3-12 Credits.

The course is designed to integrate subject matter from major coursework and other disciplines into a project that leads to the creation of an original body of knowledge.
Typically Offered: On sufficient demand.
Repeatable: Up to 12 Credits.

HIST 497. Internship. 3-12 Credits.

An opportunity for students to apply classroom learning to an on-the-job work experience. Internship must be related to the student's major or minor course of study and may be in any geographic location. Credit is granted in the range of three to twelve hours per semester and may be repeated up to a maximum of 12 credit hours. Application and approval through Career Services.
Typically Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer.
Prerequisites: Junior Standing or Senior Standing and cum GPA of 2.50 or higher.
Grading: S/U only.
Repeatable: Up to 12 Credits.

HIST 499. Special Topics. 1-4 Credits.

Courses not offered in the regular catalog that provide an opportunity to extend student learning.
Typically Offered: On sufficient demand.
Repeatable: Up to 12 Credits.

POLS 115. American National Government. 3 Credits.

A study of the history, institutions, and principles of the United States government, along with its current major policy concerns and political behavior.
Typically Offered: Fall, even years.

POLS 116. State and Local Government. 3 Credits.

A study of the development, structure, and operation of American state and local governments and their roles in the lives of the American people.
Typically Offered: Fall, odd years.

POLS 299. Special Topics. 1-4 Credits.

Courses not offered in the regular catalog that provide an opportunity to extend student learning.
Typically Offered: On sufficient demand.
Repeatable: Up to 12 Credits.

POLS 303. Canadian Government and Politics. 3 Credits.

A study of the development, structure, and operation of Canadian government with special emphasis on the parliamentary system.
Typically Offered: On sufficient demand.

POLS 330. Understanding Statistics. 3 Credits.

This course is an introduction to descriptive, inferential, and correlated statistics. Emphasis is placed on determining when to use each type of test and how to read and discuss statistical analyses. Cross-referenced with COMM 330, PSYC 330, and SOC 330.
Typically Offered: Fall.
Prerequisite: MATH 103 or MATH 104.
Same As: COMM/POLS/PSYC/SOC 330.

POLS 340. Research Methods. 3 Credits.

An exploration of social research processes and analyses. Fundamentals and specific application of the most common data gathering and measurement techniques are addressed. Cross-referenced with COMM 340, PSYC 340, and SOC 340.
Typically Offered: Fall, Spring.
Prerequisites: ENGL 110, ENGL 120 or ENGL 125, and COMM 330/POLS 330/PSYC 330/SOC 330.
Same As: COMM/POLS/PSYC/SOC 340.

POLS 375. U.S. Constitution: Federalism. 3 Credits.

A narrative and case study of the development of the U.S. Constitution including U.S. Supreme Court decisions related to the development of Federalism in fact and theory. Cross-referenced with HIST 375.
Typically Offered: Spring, even years.
Same As: HIST 375/POLS 375.

POLS 376. U.S. Constitution: Civil Liberties. 3 Credits.

A narrative and case study of the development of the U.S. Constitution including U.S. Supreme Court decisions related to the exercise of civil liberty in fact and theory. Cross-referenced with HIST 376.
Typically Offered: Fall, odd years.
Same As: HIST 376/POLS 376.

POLS 380. The American Presidency. 3 Credits.

A study of the development of the American presidency through time including representative presidential administrations, i.e. Washington, Jefferson, Jackson, Lincoln, Theodore Roosevelt, Wilson, Franklin D. Roosevelt, Truman, Eisenhower, Johnson, Nixon, Carter, Reagan, and Bush. Cross-referenced with HIST 380.
Typically Offered: Fall, even years.
Same As: HIST 380/POLS 380.

POLS 394. Independent Study. 1-3 Credits.

Directed reading, study, and/or activities in selected topics.
Typically Offered: On sufficient demand.
Repeatable: Up to 12 Credits.

POLS 395. Student Government Practicum. 1 Credit.

This course provides students who are elected to Student Senate a practicum experience in student government.
Typically Offered: Fall, Spring.
Repeatable: Up to 4 Credits.

POLS 399. Special Topics. 1-4 Credits.

Courses not offered in the regular catalog that provide an opportunity to extend student learning.
Typically Offered: On sufficient demand.
Repeatable: Up to 12 Credits.

POLS 425. International Relations. 3 Credits.

This course is a wide-ranging introduction to the core theories, actors, and themes involved in contemporary international affairs. The course is comprehensive in its subject matter, although not exhaustive in detail. Its major objective is to introduce students to a wide range of issues and problems that have focused the attention of policy-makers, academics, and citizens throughout the 20th century.
Typically Offered: Fall, even years.

POLS 494. Undergraduate Research. 3-12 Credits.

The course is designed to integrate subject matter from major coursework and other disciplines into a project that leads to the creation of an original body of knowledge.
Typically Offered: On sufficient demand.
Repeatable: Up to 12 Credits.

POLS 497. Internship. 3-12 Credits.

An opportunity for students to apply classroom learning to an on-the-job work experience. Internship must be related to the student's major or minor course of study and may be in any geographic location. Credit is granted in the range of three to twelve hours per semester and may be repeated up to a maximum of 12 credit hours. Application and approval through Career Services.
Typically Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer.
Prerequisites: Junior Standing or Senior Standing and cum GPA of 2.50 or higher.
Grading: S/U only.
Repeatable: Up to 12 Credits.

POLS 499. Special Topics. 1-4 Credits.

Courses not offered in the regular catalog that provide an opportunity to extend student learning.
Typically Offered: On sufficient demand.
Repeatable: Up to 12 Credits.

PSYC 111. Introduction to Psychology. 3 Credits.

A survey of the scientific study of behavior and mental processes.
Typically Offered: Fall, Spring.

PSYC 250. Developmental Psychology. 3 Credits.

A survey of the psychology of human life span development.
Typically Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer.
Prerequisite: PSYC 111.

PSYC 310. Behavior Modification. 3 Credits.

Introduction to basic principles and techniques of behavior modification. Emphasis is placed on the use of behavior modification techniques in self-management, education, child rearing, and helping professions. Cross-referenced with SPED 310
Typically Offered: Spring.
Prerequisite: PSYC 111.
Same As: PSYC 310/SPED 310.

PSYC 330. Understanding Statistics. 3 Credits.

This course is an introduction to descriptive, inferential, and correlated statistics. Emphasis is placed on determining when to use each type of test and how to read and discuss statistical analyses. Cross-referenced with COMM 330, POLS 330, and SOC 330.
Typically Offered: Fall.
Prerequisite: MATH 103 or MATH 104.
Same As: COMM/POLS/PSYC/SOC 330.

PSYC 340. Research Methods. 3 Credits.

An exploration of social research processes and analyses. Fundamentals and specific application of the most common data gathering and measurement techniques are addressed. Cross referenced with COMM 340, POLS 340, and SOC 340.
Typically Offered: Fall, Spring.
Prerequisites: ENGL 110, ENGL 120 or ENGL 125, and COMM 330/POLS 330/PSYC 330/SOC 330.
Same As: COMM/POLS/PSYC/SOC 340.

PSYC 350. Social Psychology. 3 Credits.

A study of the effects of social influence and physical environment on human behavior. Examines how people affect each other and how they are affected by social situations. Among the topics covered are social cognition, attitudes, social interaction, attraction, aggression, prejudice, conformity, and gender roles. Cross-referenced with SOC 350.
Typically Offered: Spring.
Prerequisites: PSYC 111 and COMM 340/POLS 340/PSYC 340/SOC 340.
Same As: PSYC 350/SOC 350.

PSYC 360. Group Dynamics. 3 Credits.

An examination of human interaction within groups. Small group processes are practiced. Theories of interpersonal relations, team building, leadership, and conflict management are discussed. Students will observe group dynamics by interacting within small groups and by developing group presentations. Cross-referenced with COMM 360 and SOC 360.
Typically Offered: Fall.
Prerequisite: PSYC 111.
Same As: COMM 360/PSYC 360/SOC 360.

PSYC 370. Abnormal Psychology. 3 Credits.

A survey of the classification, symptoms, etiology, and treatment of psychological disorders.
Typically Offered: Fall.
Prerequisite: PSYC 111.

PSYC 380. Human Sexuality. 3 Credits.

A study of the role and meaning of human sexuality in relations to oneself as well as in all interrelationships with other people. Course work includes a study of anatomy and physiology of the reproductive system, human sexual response, process and role of identity, sexual value systems, contraception, and the importance of sexuality in preparation for family living. Cross-referenced with BIOL 380 and HPER 380.
Typically Offered: Fall, Spring.
Same As: BIOL 380/HPER 380/PSYC 380.

PSYC 394. Independent Study. 1-3 Credits.

Directed reading, study, and/or activities in selected topics.
Typically Offered: On sufficient demand.
Repeatable: Up to 12 Credits.

PSYC 410. Mental Health. 3 Credits.

A study of the ongoing process of adjustment. This course focuses on how to help people apply psychological insights and principles to their own lives as a way of achieving better understanding of themselves and living more effectively.
Typically Offered: Fall.
Prerequisite: PSYC 111.

PSYC 450. Personality Theories. 3 Credits.

An examination of major psychological theories related to personality. Special attention is given to the interrelated subparts of personality development, personality dynamics, complex personality processes, and evaluation.
Typically Offered: Spring.
Prerequisite: PSYC 111.

PSYC 470. Counseling Theory and Practice. 3 Credits.

A study of counseling principles and practices in educational, industrial, and community settings. Philosophy, objectives, and organization are stressed.
Typically Offered: Spring.
Prerequisite: PSYC 111.

PSYC 491. Capstone. 1 Credit.

This course provides a culminating experience for students majoring in Psychology or Human Services. The course will include an applied learning activity which draws upon concepts from multiple courses in the majors.
Typically Offered: Fall.
Same As: PSYC 491/SOC 491.
Grading: S/U only.

PSYC 494. Undergraduate Research. 3-12 Credits.

The course is designed to integrate subject matter from major coursework and other disciplines into a project that leads to the creation of an original body of knowledge.
Typically Offered: On sufficient demand.
Repeatable: Up to 12 Credits.

PSYC 497. Internship. 3-12 Credits.

An opportunity for students to apply classroom learning to an on-the-job work experience. Internship must be related to the student's major or minor course of study and may be in any geographic location. Credit is granted in the range of three to twelve hours per semester and may be repeated up to a maximum of 12 credit hours. Application and approval through Career Services.
Typically Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer.
Prerequisites: Junior Standing or Senior Standing and cum GPA of 2.50 or higher.
Grading: S/U only.
Repeatable: Up to 12 Credits.

PSYC 499. Special Topics. 1-4 Credits.

Courses not offered in the regular catalog that provide an opportunity to extend student learning.
Typically Offered: On sufficient demand.
Repeatable: Up to 12 Credits.

SOC 110. Introduction to Sociology. 3 Credits.

The study of human behavior in social groups, institutions, and organization, including the impact of human interactions and social problems on human behavior.
Typically Offered: Fall, Spring.

SOC 111. Introduction to Anthropology. 3 Credits.

An introductory course on human evolution and the cross-cultural development of social institutions.
Typically Offered: Fall.

SOC 130. Introduction to Human Services. 3 Credits.

An introduction to the human service professions, including the various roles, functions, values, and personal attributes needed to function effectively in these careers. This course covers the history, practice setting, career opportunities, and philosophical concepts related to working with vulnerable populations.
Typically Offered: Spring, even years.

SOC 220. The Family. 3 Credits.

A study of the family as an important societal institution. The course takes a historical and sociological perspective, examining the impact of gender, social class, and race/ethnicity on families in the U.S.
Typically Offered: Spring.

SOC 251. Introduction to Gerontology. 3 Credits.

The analysis of aging within the context of the life cycle with emphasis on the major concerns of the elderly and social policies that affect the lives of the elderly.
Typically Offered: Fall, even years.
Prerequisite: SOC 110.

SOC 270. Native American Studies. 3 Credits.

A multicultural study of Native American cultural and historical development. Topics addressed include interactions with European and Anglo-American settlers and government, agency and the concept of the Middle Ground, U.S. federal Indian policy, cultural resurgence, and North Dakota Indian tribes. Cross-referenced with HIST 270.
Typically Offered: Fall, even years.
Same As: HIST 270/SOC 270,HIST 270/SOC 270.

SOC 299. Special Topics. 1-4 Credits.

Courses not offered in the regular catalog that provide an opportunity to extend student learning.
Typically Offered: On sufficient demand.
Repeatable: Up to 12 Credits.

SOC 300. Race, Ethnic, and Gender Relations. 3 Credits.

The social-historical study of racial, ethnic, and gender relations. Cross-referenced as HIST 300.
Typically Offered: Fall, odd years.
Prerequisite: SOC 110.
Same As: HIST 300/SOC 300.

SOC 330. Understanding Statistics. 3 Credits.

This course is an introduction to descriptive, inferential, and correlated statistics. Emphasis is placed on determining when to use each type of test and how to read and discuss statistical analyses. Cross-referenced with COMM 330, POLS 330, and PSYC 330.
Typically Offered: Fall.
Prerequisite: MATH 103 or MATH 104.
Same As: COMM/POLS/PSYC/SOC 330.

SOC 340. Research Methods. 3 Credits.

An exploration of social research processes and analyses. Fundamentals and specific application of the most common data gathering and measurement techniques are addressed. Cross referenced with COMM 340, POLS 340, and PSYC 340.
Typically Offered: Fall, Spring.
Prerequisites: ENGL 110, ENGL 120 or ENGL 125, and COMM 330/POLS 330/PSYC 330/SOC 330.
Same As: COMM/POLS/PSYC/SOC 340.

SOC 350. Social Psychology. 3 Credits.

A study of the effects of social influence and physical environment on human behavior. Examines how people affect each other and how they are affected by social situations. Among the topics covered are social cognition, attitudes, social interaction, attraction, aggression, prejudice, conformity, and gender roles. Cross-referenced with PSYC 350.
Typically Offered: Spring.
Prerequisites: PSYC 111 and COMM 340/POLS 340/PSYC 340/SOC 340.
Same As: PSYC 350/SOC 350.

SOC 354. Health, Illness, and Disability. 3 Credits.

A study of the ways in which society influences our definitions and understanding of health, illness, and disability. Topics include health care delivery, utilization, and system structure; the relationship between health professionals and patients; inequality in health care and treatment; social constructions of wellness, illness, healing, and disability; and the meaning and experience of illness and disability.
Typically Offered: Spring, even years.
Prerequisite: SOC 110.

SOC 360. Group Dynamics. 3 Credits.

An examination of human interaction within groups. Small group processes are practiced. Theories of interpersonal relations, team building, leadership, and conflict management are discussed. Students will observe group dynamics by interacting within small groups and by developing group presentations. Cross-referenced as COMM 360 and PSYC 360.
Typically Offered: Fall.
Prerequisite: PSYC 111.
Same As: COMM 360/PSYC 360/SOC 360.

SOC 390. Criminology and Delinquency. 3 Credits.


Typically Offered: Fall, odd years.
Prerequisite: SOC 110.
Same As: CJ 390/SOC 390.

SOC 394. Independent Study. 1-3 Credits.

Directed reading, study, and/or activities in selected topics.
Typically Offered: On sufficient demand.
Repeatable: Up to 12 Credits.

SOC 399. Special Topics. 1-4 Credits.

Courses not offered in the regular catalog that provide an opportunity to extend student learning.
Typically Offered: On sufficient demand.
Repeatable: Up to 12 Credits.

SOC 422. Social Science Theory. 3 Credits.

A focus on sociological and social psychological theories and conceptual frameworks. Both classic and contemporary theories and conceptual frameworks are discussed and explored. Examples of theoretical frameworks discussed include functionalism, conflict theory, symbolic interaction and feminist theories. The course should be taken in junior or senior year.
Typically Offered: Fall.
Prerequisite: SOC 110.

SOC 425. Sociology/Psychology of Sport. 2 Credits.

An upper-level course that combines the social sciences of sociology and psychology in the sport setting. Sociology unites include sport and racism, politics, economics, religion, and societal pressures. Psychology units include learning processes, motivation, mental preparation, and communication skills. Cross-referenced as HPER 425.
Typically Offered: Fall, odd years.
Prerequisite: SOC 110.
Same As: HPER 425/SOC 425.

SOC 441. Death and Dying. 3 Credits.

A multidisciplinary study of historical and contemporary perspectives on death and dying. Topics include individual and societal attitudes towards death, dying, and end-of-life issues; cultural differences and customs; professions and industries associated with death and dying; bereavement and grief; ethics and end-of-life concerns; and portrayals of death and dying in popular culture.
Typically Offered: Spring, odd years.
Prerequisite: SOC 110.

SOC 491. Capstone. 1 Credit.

This course provides a culminating experience for students majoring in Psychology or Human Services. The course will include an applied learning activity which draws upon concepts from multiple courses in the majors.
Typically Offered: Fall.
Same As: PSYC 491/SOC 491.
Grading: S/U only.

SOC 494. Undergraduate Research. 3-12 Credits.

The course is designed to integrate subject matter from major coursework and other disciplines into a project that leads to the creation of an original body of knowledge.
Typically Offered: On sufficient demand.
Repeatable: Up to 12 Credits.

SOC 497. Internship. 3-12 Credits.

An opportunity for students to apply classroom learning to an on-the-job work experience. Internship must be related to the student's major or minor course of study and may be in any geographic location. Credit is granted in the range of three to twelve hours per semester and may be repeated up to a maximum of 12 credit hours. Application and approval through Career Services.
Typically Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer.
Prerequisites: Junior Standing or Senior Standing and cum GPA of 2.50 or higher.
Grading: S/U only.
Repeatable: Up to 12 Credits.

SOC 499. Special Topics. 1-4 Credits.

Courses not offered in the regular catalog that provide an opportunity to extend student learning.
Typically Offered: On sufficient demand.
Repeatable: Up to 12 Credits.